M is for Pamela Morsi

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One of the great delights as I continue this post series is how intertwined the various books are starting to become. Themes and connections are coming from the woodwork out, which is incredibly gratifying for someone who thinks of books as part of a grand conversation anyways. Last week Eloisa James broke my heart (and not in the good way) with her depiction of a character with a mental impairment caused by oxygen deprivation at birth: Pamela Morsi’s earthy and charming Simple Jess is the perfect book to read as a follow-up, since it features a character with a similar disability and an identical cause. Unlike Rupert, however, Jesse Best is the hero of his story, with a POV and HEA and everything. This book was recommended by Ridley and it more than lived up to its reputation for empathy and charm: Jesse’s depiction is thoughtful and rounded and avoids many of the common problems of mental disability in fiction. (Counterexample: Colleen McCullough’s Tim, which to my shame I read dozens of times in high school.) Additionally, the romance as a whole brings up but doesn’t answer many surprisingly troubling questions about society, difference, and belonging that invite further feminist critique.

Cover of Simple Jess by Pamela Morsi. Blue and pink gradient background with leaves, pine needles, twigs, and a blown dandelion clock. Text is serifed and highly ornate.The village of Marrying Stone is a place where codes of behavior are rigid and vehemently policed by the inhabitants: “On Marrying Stone Mountain, being different was not thought altogether to be such a good thing” (3288). There’s no government or law to speak of, outside of the farcical kangaroo court (which I found both entertaining and excruciating): all the pressure to conform is social pressure rooted in familial ties and individual force of will. The good people of Marrying Stone know what is right and they will require you behave accordingly.

In this narrow-eyed, strong-minded world, every major character struggles with a mark of difference. Heroine Althea is determined to stay unmarried and is letting a fertile farm lie unplowed (hur hur hur); hero Jesse Best tries to be “a man like other men” despite the mental impairment that makes him an outsider even in his own head; Mavis Phillips worries that someone other than her brother will learn she slept with Eben Baxley contrary to ideals of feminine chastity; Oather Phillips worries that the village (and his father) will find out he isn’t drawn to women the way that other men are. Every family/gender role is set and specific, every activity has long-standing rules and traditions: hunting, farming, butchering, the Literary, the kangaroo court. Even the constant near-feud state between McNees and Piggotts is way of maintaining the boundaries of set categories, even though the bloodlines of the two families have been mixed and mingled for generations.

Social pressure is intense because social cooperation is necessary for survival. The people of Marrying Stone are subsistence-level farmers and hunters, and it takes careful planning and hard work to last though the winter. One of the most compelling reasons for Althea to remarry is that she cannot work her farm on her own: “She hadn’t had an idea about putting in a crop last year. Orv and Tom had offered to do it for her. But she’d turned them down flat. As she’d turned down all their offers for assistance. She hadn’t wanted their favors. She hadn’t wanted their presence” (859). These favors aren’t charity, and they aren’t neutral: “it was part of the courting process for the female to feel beholden to the gentleman” (3863). Althea can’t accept help without implying acceptance of sexual or romantic overtures as well: it’s only because Jesse is considered asexual by his fellow townsfolk that there are no innuendoes made about his presence on her farm. Even then, his chores become an indirect courtship, a way for Althea to realize that Jesse is good for her and her son as well as good for her farm. It’s a standard romance narrative — but it also fits in seamlessly with what the townsfolk expect of a courtship.

Of course, Jesse turns out to be anything but asexual. When the town learns of the kiss he shared with Althea, they have to remove him from the category of “child” and place him in the category of “man,” with assumed sexual desires and agency:

Jesse Best had kissed a woman and now people knew it. Whether they believed that Althea had led him on or not, parents would be warning their daughters to steer clear. The notion folks now had of Jesse Best would include not just his sweetness, his strength, and the sounds of his fiddle, but also his sexuality. For folks on the mountain, simple and sex didn’t go together. That was a thing to be feared. (3150).

Despite the town’s newfound suspicion, our hero’s pants-feelings are explicitly coded as natural by the text: “‘The feelings you get in your body, Jesse, they are the same feelings that other men get and they have nothing to do with your mind.'” (1834). Jesse’s mental struggles mean he is forced to depend more on instinct than logic to make decisions: this is often expressed in naturalistic terms, as when he trusts his hunting dogs to be aware of predators in the woods, or describes his sensitivity to people’s scents. I’ll admit to being charmed by Jesse’s private terms for arousal and sexuality, especially “round parts”; don’t we all create our own internal shorthand for sex, after all, even if we know the cultural or clinical terms?

And of course our heroine is equally enthralled, again tied to the idea of naturalness:

He was no practiced lover, but it was his love, as natural as his beauty, that had drawn her into his embrace as easily as had his arms. And it was that authenticity that had kept her there, reveling in the pleasure of it. (4360)

But Jesse’s sexuality is only natural because it is expressed in a heterosexual direction: the closeted Oather Phillips has no such luxury, even though his response to Jesse’s good looks are identical to our heroine’s:

“My God, he is beautiful.” The words, spoken in near reverence, came from the man standing next to her.

“Yes, he is,” she answered languidly from her sensual trance. “Oh!” Her horrified little squeak came immediately thereafter. Althea looked over at Oather, shocked that he had read her thoughts, and such wicked thoughts, too.

Oather stared back at her, his eyes wide in equal alarm. It was as if he too were aghast at his own words. (4360).

Oather’s queerness is often expressed in coded terms, but it’s clear enough to a reader familiar with closeted characters in romance. His behavior toward Althea during his courtship, sadly, is often categorized as unnatural: “Oather put such a polite face on everything. It felt so unnatural, so constrained. He was much aware of the rules of etiquette. Somehow she found Jesse’s more honest assessment more to her liking” (3863). It’s an open question whether this unnaturalness is located in Oather’s denial of who he is and who he wants, or in his homosexual desire more generally: “Oather felt uncomfortable about commenting on what was natural” (3377). He is palpably uncomfortable when attempting to perform any of the prescribed behaviors of heterosexual masculinity: courting, hunting, sexual aggression (Althea notices he doesn’t try and cop a feel like the other men do). Manliness in this book is identified with heterosexuality: we have no burly bearded hunters falling in love with other burly bearded hunters. (Though that sounds like it’d be fun to read.) Jesse Best’s revealed heterosexuality and its expression brings both him and Althea into line with community standards: his simple-mindedness is proven to be compatible with Marrying Stone’s vision of masculinity, and her isolation is ended by marriage and acquiring a husband who can help her farm and raise Baby Paisley. Oather Phillips, on the other hand, spectacularly fails to perform masculinity and nearly kills a child in a hunting accident. His shock at this near-miss is the impetus for him to finally confront his father and leave Marrying Stone for good: “Oather’s different,” Althea says at the book’s end. “He’s always been different from folks here on the mountain. Maybe somewhere else he’ll find folks that are more like him” (5159).

I have said that Jesse and Althea are reintegrated into the community of Marrying Stone, but it’s not a pure surrender. Granny Piggott, sharp-tongued matriarch, gives Althea some advice that subverts the immutability of Marrying Stone’s codes: “Listen and learn. What is worthwhile — and for all that I don’t take great store by Beulah’s pronouncements, there is bound to be some worthwhile — that you keep. The rest you just smile and say thank you, and forget you ever heard it” (3713). This advice preserves the form of tradition, if not the substance. Difference can be masked, not erased. But unlike Althea and Jesse, Oather cannot follow this advice, since his particular brand of difference invites/implies the participation of someone else, another gay man who would then have to similarly reject traditional categories of masculinity. So Oather goes to New Orleans, where apparently there are people like himself, according to the vision that semi-magical Pastor Jay gets from the angels at the end of the book:

“You can show me his future? Now that’s a neat trick if I ever heard one. Let’s see you try. — Why yes, I see it. I see it now. Ain’t this pretty. What a beautiful place. The boy looks so happy. All those friends around. Everybody laughing. What a wonderful place. Oh, Lord, it’s not what I think, is it? — It’s Heaven, ain’t it? Poor Oather dies young and goes to Heaven. — It’s not Heaven. Then where is it? — New Orleans? Hmmm. Sure looks like Heaven from here.” (5568)

This ending is an optimistic one, but it is also a kind of death. It seems Ms. Morsi is playing against the Kill Your Gays trope, but in a way that still invokes it — hence Pastor Jay’s assumption that Oather dies young. This is the final passage in the book and it brings into question the value of separatism: is it satisfying when the narrative suggests that Marrying Stone does not constitute an entire world? That not everybody can be comfortably or safely a part of this small and insular mountain community? That other communities, with other rules, exist? How hard must we work to reform the societies we live in? Is our effort better spent simply creating societies that are safer and more inclusive? What do we stand to gain by leaving oppressive communities, and what have we lost?

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Thoughtful blogger Jackie C. Horne at Romance Novels for Feminists has a great post on interpretations of disability in romance fiction. Books mentioned include Simple Jess, Tim, The Madness of Lord Ian Mackenzie and others.

Writer Nina Mitchell had a stroke at age 26 and now writes frankly about her experience and daily life. I found her through her series for the Hairpin, but she also runs her own site, Mindpop, with more current updates.

Sunita at Vacuous Minx had a provocative and many-layered post about disability devotees, fetish reading, content warnings/trigger warnings, and genre definitions that has more thoughts in it than I believed one blog post could contain. Comments highly recommended as well.

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Morsi, Pamela. Simple Jess. Jove Books, 2011. Ebook.

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8 thoughts on “M is for Pamela Morsi

  1. “What do we stand to gain by leaving oppressive communities, and what have we lost?”

    That might be another theme running through this series: you mentioned that the protagonists have to leave at the end of Harmony and Gold Mountain.

  2. This one actually looks really, really good. I tend to shy away from themes with mental impairment–that and slavery press all my discomfort buttons in literature, but it looks like I might enjoy this one. I’m adding it to my wishlist now, thanks!

  3. P.S. The prequel to SJ, Marrying Stone is also worth reading. Although it’s theoretically about Jess’s sister, it’s largely a bromance between the hero and Jess.

  4. Morsi’s use of language in this book was just stunning; I’m definitely going to go backlist-hunting. 🙂

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