Tag Archives: my books

Why I’m Entering My Ellora’s Cave Book In The RITAs This Year

1. Because I love my book.

In my subjective and unashamedly biased opinion, At His Countess’ Pleasure is the best and weirdest thing I’ve written. It’s quiet historical melodrama starring a dominant brunette social climber and a chunky earl with a mustache. There’s also pegging, and period sex, and at one point a 19th-century gynecological exam (or the nearest approximation I could get according to research). At one point the hero — have you got your pearls handy for clutching? — loses his erection during a sex scene. So subversive! Not as subversive as including an actually diverse cast of characters and writing about something other than British aristocrats would have been — but I’m taking baby steps here, pushing my own limits.

This book pushed a lot of limits. I launched into the writing of it with great abandon, and told myself I could break every rule I wanted because it was just to fulfill a contract clause and then at the end there was a story I loved and was excited to show to the world. So in one sense I was kind of fucked, but in another sense: hooray!

And I will be damned if anyone takes that away from me.

2. Because entering the RITAs means I get to judge the RITAs.

I’ve judged a couple of contests — including PNWA, for those of you in the Northwest — and I really enjoy it. But judging a non-romance-centric contest’s romance/erotica category can be a bit, well, dicey. One manuscript entered by one gentleman was basically wall-to-wall rape scenes, presented as titillation. Very difficult to read, even as an excerpt.

I want to know what the RITAs look like in process. I want to see the difference between the books I’m sent and the books that make the final list, the ones that get officially celebrated. And I’ve never had a chance to do it before.

As a published author and RWA member, I could qualify to judge the RITAs by joining the Published Author Network (PAN). In fact, I did try to do this last summer. I counted up my royalties and figured out that one of my books had reached the required $1000 mark to allow me to apply.

The only problem: I needed proof of those royalties. From my publisher, Ellora’s Cave.

You can laugh if you want to. I understand. (Most up-to-date masterpost here, if you can stand it.)

After many emails, I got a response: EC sent me an Excel spreadsheet with one year of royalties for that one title. Only numbers; no text. And it wasn’t even a locked spreadsheet. RWA quite naturally laughed at the idea that this could constitute proof of payment in any meaningful sense of the word. My only other option was to copy every single royalty statement for all my titles — two years’ worth of financial records — and highlight the book that qualified every time it appeared. I found I was uncomfortable at the thought of showing that much personal data to someone I wasn’t paying taxes to. There the matter rested — until RWA announced that all RITA entrants would be required to judge. It feels like a gift that I can finally do this.

3. Because I already paid for the print copies.

Three days before my publisher filed the now-infamous defamation suit against Dear Author, I spent over a hundred bucks out of pocket to get contest copies printed by Vlad at Third Place Press. (Disclosure: Vlad is both a friend and a bookselling wizard). While the books look incredibly beautiful — you can see them in person at this weekend’s Emerald City Book Fair, where I’ll have a few copies to give away — I would never have had them printed had the lawsuit been filed first.

Oh, I have a few noble reasons for that; anyone who tells you this case is not about free speech has not been paying adequate attention. But it’s also true that unless I enter the RITAs, I have to consider that cash layout wasted. I can’t currently promote this book for sale or for review, not without implicitly supporting a lawsuit that grates against every nerve I have. I’ve requested the rights back from EC — for Countess and for all my books — but Countess only came out two months ago. The print version is the only format I can do something useful with. I can’t sell it, but at least I can see how it stacks up as a romance elbowing around in the wild among other romances. This would be valuable to me, separate from any notion of sales or self-promotion.

Lastly,  I’m entering the RITAs despite all the mess, because:

4. It’s my last chance.

This book is my last chance to enter the RITAs for the foreseeable future. I haven’t placed my next manuscript with another publisher yet — anyone who wants a sweetly steamy ancient Greek romance with a robot heroine feel free to let me know! —  and my current manuscript is trending more romantic elements/sff/New Weird. Intertwining romance subplots! Semi-omniscient POV sections! Twists on monsters and myth that leave me giggling in fiendish delight! One detail popped out of my subconscious, slithered onto the page, and creeped me out so much I had to shut the computer and do something else. It’s super-fun and an ambitious experiment — but a RITA book it is probably not.

I don’t know when I’ll have another book published to qualify for the contest, and of course I’m ineligible for the Golden Heart. I’m not saying farewell to romance as a genre — but I might be moving away from the RWA-approved definition of romance as established for the RITA contest.

I have this one chance, and I’m going to take it.

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Release Day: At His Countess’ Pleasure

If you are not reading about Ferguson — though really, you should be reading about Ferguson, and here’s a good roundup to start — you may as well be reading my latest book, which is out today from Ellora’s CaveAt His Countess’ Pleasure is a femdom marriage of convenience erotic historical; the working title was Pegging the Earl, which should tell you what kind of sex scenes you might be in for.

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Countess Cover Reveal!

I have just received the cover for my next Ellora’s Cave release, available from the publisher’s website August 15 and other ebook retailers soon thereafter.

Cover image for At His Countess' Pleasure by Olivia Waite.

I’m quite happy with it! I am especially fond of that large swirly P in the word ‘pleasure,’ and the luscious red of her dress. I must also admit to being initially confused about the shoulder-boob — but shoulder-boob, you see, is totally the new sideboob. So hot right now.

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Announcing: At His Countess’ Pleasure

Did you enjoy Color Me Bad? You’ll be glad to hear there’s going to be a sequel! It’s an angsty little gem of a novelette and I’m absurdly delighted with it. Here is the blurb!

Scandal has a long life, and Miss Anne Pym is running out of patience. Her cousin’s shocking marriage to the Earl of Underwood’s brother and their subsequent entrance into trade is still a burden Anne and her sister Evangeline must bear. Their own social standing is not enough to repair the damage, so Anne boldly seeks restitution from the earl himself, whom she holds partially responsible for the disaster.
 
To her shock, the earl not only agrees he’s partly to blame, but offers to make Anne his countess. The title and the wealth that comes with it will help her mend the shattered reputation of her family — and marriage will also provide Anne with the children she desperately wants. Simon needs an heir, and for that he needs a wife, and Anne’s practicality and courage strike him as useful traits for a countess to have.
 
But marriage is a beginning rather than an ending, and Anne and Simon have much to learn about each other — and about their pasts. Old hurts and new scandals alike threaten their burgeoning passion, even as Simon finds himself more and more eager to obey his strong-willed wife’s every carnal command. When Anne’s bitterest secret emerges, destroying their hopes for the future, Simon must learn whether or not he himself is enough for a lifetime of happiness — and just how completely he is willing to submit.

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